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Political-Imran-Khan-23-March-Jalsa-at-Minar-e-Pakistan-Lahore-2077

To many it came as an unbelievable shock. For some it was an eye opener while for the rest it was a mere revelation and demonstration of the bitter reality that refused to blink and stared right back into the face.

To me and many others who had seen the environment deteriorate and the institutions, state and system ( if any ) to crumble to an extent whereby the echoes of a failed state were beginning to make regular noises, all the indicators were nose-diving whilst there was a continous hue and cry and red flags raised by the think tank and various experts, it was a prospect of a possible vibrant new beginning. It was at that point that sucked in by the state of chaos and uncertainty, the middle and affluent educated urban class was jolted to come out of its slumber and hibernation to wake-up to reality.

Whether the deck had hit the rock bottom, the only survival lied in the prospect of a change. Ignorance or avoidance wasn’t a choice any more. For survival, action was the only option. When the grounds of Minar-e-Pakistan were swamped and swarmed by the families, women, children, old and young by an electrified crowd of hundreds of thousands that cut across entire cross-section of society on Oct 30th, 2011 it was a flash point. It marked the eruption of lava from within that had been boiling for decades. Many of us who had been pulled to the venue by the mere realization of need of the hour had nothing to do with the active politics and were hence participating in our maiden political rally _ what emerged as a result was an unusually rich and unprecedented demographic, cultural and social mix that glued together into a cohesive whole for a selfless and common cause. Every soul was charged up and every one, young or old, man or woman, wanted to be counted.

For some it raised the alarm bells but for most it brought heaps of hope. It was a clear sign of a living nation who refused to budge and, if not over-emphasized, signaled a rude and rebellious awakening of a nation willing to stand and fight for its survival and rights that was put to a tranquil sleep for the loot and plunder to go on unabated.

Whilst the volcano had exploded, the aftermath and repercussions had to be enormous. The jaw dropping event and a series of others that followed shortly sent shock waves through the circles at helm. Sooner than later, it came as a bitter realization that non deliverance wasn’t an option any longer. Thus thoroughly threatened and under enormous pressure, the provincial government that had been sitting on its haunches for nearly four years ran into a state of panic that accounted for many of the gimmicks and questionable projects and initiatives that were forced down our throats while the elections were fast approaching.

But the winds of change continued to blow setting unprecedented examples and unsettling the competition that found itself more and more at loss with each shift. What we saw progressively was rise and formulation of a party structure from bottom to top on purely democratic principles; a mini revolution in this part of the globe in itself.

So when the captain stood in the shadow of the Minar-e-Pakistan once again on March 23rd, not alone but accompanied by thousands of elected representatives of his political party belonging to all walks of life, some of them hailing from very humble backgrounds, facing an endless ocean of people and waves of fluttering national as well as green and red party flags and declared with a beaming smile that the ‘change’ had arrived, he was stating the obvious. Below the stage, the emotionally charged crowd roared in frenzy waving flags and chanting slogans in sheer passion. Many of us were those who had ridiculed his intent and motives when he had started his unorthodox political movement as a novice in the same city about sixteen years ago. But it was his sincerity to the tune of devotion, determination, boldness, truthfulness, enormous love for his homeland and leadership qualities that convinced us to part ways with political inertness and rally under his flag. Most of all it was his consistency and habit of winning against all odds repeatedly and belief in himself, his God and the youth of his country that made the nation absorb new rays of hope.

Battling against the inertia, status quo and traditional politics the movement of justice continues its dynamic journey unabated. A mere morsel that began to roll down the hill many years ago gradually assumes the giant proportions of a snow ball that takes everything along in its fold. The challenge and erosion it poses to its competition is immense and grows with its dynamism and continuity progressively. Innovative and setting ever higher standards for the nation to guage, with a towering and gifted leader at the tip with a character to fill potential leadership void that has existed, it promises a better future to Pakistan and its citizens. It is a gradual process that demands decades for its materialization and consolidation. But the signs of challenge and evolution are significant. The will and determination is there. It is for the same reason that awash with rain, as if baptized and cleansed, amidst the soaring and unwavering tides of fluttering flags when the tsunami of impassioned enthusiasts listened to its leader, every soul and mortal stood its ground soaking up all the energy and verve in the air to imbibe the currents of the impending and inevitable change.

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Are we eventually not back to the square one? The ever so familiar situation repeating itself every so often _ the civil military stand off and the government and judiciary finding themselves at loggerheads yet again feeding ample fodder to the insatiable milling machine of media thankfully to sensationalize and spice things up to their liking, churning out conspiracy theories by creating an unnecessary hype at times while acting irresponsibly by neglecting the imperative developments and details at others to mislead ( read to keep informed) the public at large but to keep their business and entertainment (talk) shows going round the clock. 

The history is perhaps tired of repeating itself over and over again but we are not. While the cynical circular spectrum of events continue to go round and round statically with no linear development over the six decades, interestingly the question remains who is actually at fault? 

Was the judiciary at fault when ZAB riding the crest of a mammoth tide of popularism was hanged? Certainly! Was the judiciary at fault when the over zealous Sultan Muhammad Nawaz Sharif stormed the supreme court overwhelmed by his lust of power? Certainly not! Is the judiciary at fault now when it is taking government to task over a couple of security and political issues? Anybody’s guess! 

More? Was it democratically elected Nawaz Sharif at fault when he dismissed the then COAS Musharraf or was the military takeover a logical reaction to Sharif’s voracious desire for omnipotence while undermining the freedom of various state institutions? 

While it appears deceptively simple to single out Army as the most criminal force and factor in the equation that has arguably rooted out seeds of democratic culture that have been sown time and again but haven’t the democratic institutions failed time and again and caved in owing to their intrinsic weakness, imbalance, disharmony and reckless measures? I am certainly not for khakis to step in or marching boots to trample the constitution at their own free will. There are far too many lessons to learn from the autocratic Islamic revolution led by Hazarat General Muhammad Zia ul Haq and later, in stark contrast, the radiant era of “Renaissance” unleashed by enlightened moderator Mush__ both reminding us of the ages of darkness ironically in one way or the other. But the fact remains that unlike the rest, Military is the only disciplined and organized institution of the state with supposedly far less public dealing and external influence. In all fairness, doesn’t Military get more than its due share of blame for the failure of state or democratic process or institutions? Again, even if for the argument’s sake, Military is the mother of all ills, isn’t failure of a major state institution to understand its due role and to overstep its limits or jurisdiction blatantly time and again be deemed as the failure of democracy or system itself? 

If so, this brings us back to the million dollar question, how in the world do the tenets of western democracy offer the best solution to our typical political, social and economic problems that have failed to grab roots in sixty four years?

 If going to the polls with 35 million bogus registered votes every now and then and casting our vote in the favour of the candidate solely on the basis of birardari or “kinship” as Anatol Lieven ( Pakistan a hard country) puts it earns us the licence to be a democratic state, who are we fooling by expecting a change to take place simply by sticking to this ritual? Not to undermine our society, but have we got the literacy, awareness, religious and social freedom and justice, tradition and maturity to inculcate that culture of expression of freedom, tolerance, mutual respect, equal rights for all human beings that constitute the spirit of democracy together?   

If not, then why are we obsessed with the secular models of western democracy that will never work for us or has never gained roots in the sixty four years of the existence ofPakistanas a state? 

My dear friends and intellectuals who cannot see beyond the dazzling virtues of democracy and exist as if only to keep on harping about it, let us be honest and analyze is democracy the only system that has brought about change coupled with social and economic upliftment round the globe or region? We may snub China for poor human rights standings but what has brought about that magnificent rise in its economic power and splendour? Democracy? Why forget the Asian tigersSingapore? While the state has remained a kingdom with no natural resources of its own (even the drinking water is to be imported from the neighbouring Malaysia), who can deny the remarkable turn around in its stature and economic fate that has earned it the informal title of the ‘Most orderly state” in the world just in a few decades? 

Call it our mindset but name a single mainstream political party that has nurtured democratic culture within its rank and file. Does passing the leadership on to the next generation or the memebers of the family like personal fiefdom or heritage does not negate the spirit of the democracy itself? Or is it perfectly cool to build on a monarchy of  Sharifs, Bhuttos, Zardaris & Madaris while harping about democratic traditions and process?

To cut it short, there may well be countless virtues and democracy may still be the best form of governance but what good is it if it does not deliver but rather dis-enfranchise the masses to the point where the state is brought to the brink of its existential threat?

To me, democracy is after all a means or mode to deliver! 

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There is that young promising bright girl who makes it to the hot seat of the plagiarized illustration of ‘Who wants to be a millionaire’– Junaid Jamshed’s faithful mullah compliant Islamic version_ Alif Laam Meem. She runs through the early rounds quickly until the poor girl is disastrously stuck by the revelation, no less challenging than the laurels of the restlessly wandering and now eternally and peacefully asleep Columbus, that she has been asked to discover the God forsakenly unknown place of Congo somewhere on the globe. Stunned, the girl wisely decides to opt for ‘Shoora’. As it turns out nearly three quarters of the house overwhelmed with excitement, momentarily passes the verdict, to somehow, relocate the state in question from Africa to Asia. The girl confidently and proudly announces to go with the ‘majority’ only to be shocked at how she has been let down by the ‘overwhelming majority’.

This was just a game that she unfortunately lost but are we losing something by blindly going with the ‘majority’ in Pakistan for years?

Let us now visit a class of physics or mathematics with a mix of average and above average students with a couple of exceptional ones like any representative group or class. The professor comes up with a tricky numeric and logical problem. ‘Majority’ is unable to see through it offering a unique but wrong answer while only a handful get to analyze it properly to give the proper solution.

Now who is specifically right here? The mediocre majority?

A strong counter argument to the later case may well lie in the statement that the real life analytical problems are not a quiz of mathematics or science but have diverse solutions with no one right answer to an issue or a problem.

True my dear friends but who has to unravel those ‘right answers’ in a democratic state? The representatives of the people? Elected by whom? Masses mired in guts of feudalism, ethnicity, sectarianism and bradarism? They may well be adjudged as ‘aware’ but what percentage can be assumed as truly educated and is prepared to see beyond the basic survival needs of bread and butter or thana kachahri? When the much trumpeted ‘freedom to choose’ gets so myopic, coerced, insensitive and selfish at the very core what representation do we expect to emerge over and over again and what improvement do we expect out of it?

Are we not living in a fool’s paradise if we expect any change to spring out of the rotten electoral system?

For these apparent underlying reasons, those who see the current version of democracy as a self-correcting and self- cleansing mechanism should rest assured that we are conveniently tied up only in an endless vicious cycle.

Let us just glance at the structures and ranks and file of our political parties. How many of them can claim to be democratic in their spirit ? Not PML (N) that proudly elected NS as its president after a fierce and sapping electoral battle and is now resorting to infighting for the aspiring members are lobbying NOT to be elected but handpicked by the party leadership. But then why do we clamour and tend to forget that the party draws its roots and strength from the ashes of a mard-e-momin?

PPP? It has more Ps than democratic dimensions. We hope and pray that our endearing jaan nasheen Bilawal Bhutto Zardari descends from the skies safely to take the reigns of the party leadership one fine morning as soon as he turns twenty five.

MQM ? Duh! PTI…maybe. I am not sure. The only political party that may boast of being truly democratic in its organizational structure turns out be JI that we insist does not represent the mainstream populace!

While all these political parties continue to thrive by virtue of their sheer undemocratic character weaved round the presence of a singular monumental individual, living or dead (half dead in some cases), can we conclude that our eastern loyalist (or perhaps sycophant behaviour and mindset; thanks to our existence as colonial slaves for centuries) invariably breeds an inherent and subliminal desire to bow our heads before an authoritative monarch?

So de we have something wrong with our democracy, national psyche, awareness or political parties?

Whatever, that may well be but I can’t believe that there is something NOT seriously wrong in this equation. Perhaps we can not single that out and perhaps its a complicated mix of more than one destabilizing factors. But the point and discussion remains that a blind and unquestionable trust and faith in the tenets of western democracy is not working for us. A tide of socialism has come and lapsed. Its violent and raging currents swept the likes of mighty super power USSR in its wake. Whereas, the recent spate of crisis has shaken the foundations of the power centres of the west grounded firmly into democratic traditions backed by vested interests and unruly corporate and capitalist mafias. Where does this crumbling ultimately lead to is anybody’s guess!?

Returning to the point, democracy may well be the ultimate solution to all our blistering issues; Maybe not! What needs to be done is to walk out of this shell and paradigm and approach the question with an un-predisposed and open mindset, taking all the variables and stakes into account and forge a solution that comes out as the best remedial fit for our unique and diverse social, cultural, religious, economic and demographic demands.

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The world we are living in has changed and is transforming at a phenomenal pace. If technology has revolutionized one thing over the years that for sure is communication. Gone are the days when voice of masses, a populist movement or uprising could be hushed or silenced by authority and censorship. Liberation of media, advent of internet and social media in particular has changed the rules of the game altogether. If someone has any doubts, please revisit the events of recent upsurge in Tunisia, Egyptand Middle East. What was the dynamic behind the abrupt change in the region that brought an autocratic rule to its knees within days of the suicide of a young university graduate despite all authority and censorship?

Yes. As much as the followers of strong leadership theories (I being one of them) hate to believe, it was the popular campaign and well co-ordinated effort through social media such as Facebook, twitter, youtube and blogsphere that moblized the educated and impassioned youth to the point that rattled the forces of status quo and shook the foundations of the monarchs and military backed regimes in the entire region. In the event of such a deluge, if leadership gets arbitrary and widespread temporarily, is beyond the discussion but more importantly what we have witnessed lately is the real power and potential of a virtual medium and social marketing in achieving objectives of an uprising or an upheaval when it has the potential to connect and resonate with the aspiration of the masses. Grasp over English language or not, a thin or narrowing tip of pyramid constituting a stream of spearheads has shown to represent and influence an exponential base and human resource at the bottom.

What brings me to resort to such an introduction is an excellent article published in the daily ‘The News’ today (June 18th, 2011; Taking social media by storm by Malik Siraj Akbar). It discusses at length about the similar phenomenon that is brewing in the much neglected but largest province of the country i.e Baluchistan. Arguably one of the least developed areas having low population and even lower literacy rate, the most critical and lethal element remains the relevance. There is no denial that Baluchis today find themselves in utter state of deprivation and negligence. Though this galvanization and resentment against the state is not a nascent development, the recent socio economic events and catastrophes have definitely alienated and disenchanted the Baluchs further.

The gruesome reality and mystery regarding the fate of missing persons remains shrouded. How ruthlessly we dealt with a 79 year old Sardar and Baluch icon, Sardar Nawab Akbar Bugti in particular and other political and national figures sharpened the wedge a great deal and intensified the feeling of unflinching hatred against the state. Baluch nationalistic sentiment is gaining momentum and only gets stronger following each clash with the security forces. It has got to the point where they are resorting to target killings and living in the province for a Punjabi or a non native is a potential life threatening risk. The lukewarm and listless response to the earthquake in Baluchistan a couple of years ago further aggravated the economic woes of the people. So much so, the blogsphere and press talked about deliberate flooding of portions of Baluchistan with allegiance of military and police to safeguard the interests of some Sindhi influential landlords during the devastating floods last year.

Poverty, hunger, disease, illiteracy, unemployment and deprivation remain the chief concerns of the tribal and gallant Baluchs. Mineral rich Balochistan is brimming with resources like natural gas, copper, coal and recently discovered huge reserves of gold. A long stretch of coastal belt runs along the shores of Makran and Gawadar but unfortunately any plans to develop potential goldmine of port of Gawadar have been jeopardized mainly because of the insecurity and partly owing to the cold war and conflicting interests of giants like America and China in the strategically located province.              
          
Isn’t it ironic that a democratic government cant even associate itself with marginalized population ( a mere 5% of the total population) of the largest ( that constitutes 44% of total area of Pakistan) but most backward and sparsely populated province of the country?

Although the history of nationalistic unrest and military intervention and use of force to curb such elements dates as far back as independence, the widening chasm and technological revolution demands a grossly varied approach to the issue. There was much propaganda of an impending economic package for Baluchistan by the prime minister but nothing has materialized so far.

Coming back to the point, there are  a number of blogs and forums that represent Baluch nationalists and promote their extreme agenda and hype on the web. Talking of most popular ‘Baluchistan’ page on Facebook alone, considering the low literacy rate, there is a following of close to 6000 individuals which by any standard or stretch of imagination is substantial. The worsening law and order and security situation doesn’t help. Thanks to social media, well organized, energetic and flambuoyant youth are quick to grab bits of news and information and share and disperse them within the community and cyber space within no time.

If the infested and bleeding wounds of Baluch pride and marginalization are not daubed with serious dialogue, concerted and well organized effort and if what the article reveals about the extent of co-ordination and the activity and commitment of Baluchs to use social media as an alternate platform to counter all censorship, we have a mammoth, ominous and worsening political challenge to tackle at our hands.

http://www.thenews.com.pk/TodaysPrintDetail.aspx?ID=53240&Cat=9&dt=6/18/2011

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Before I really get started, let me clarify that I have no personal or political affiliations with PTI or any political or religious outfit for that matter. I am an ordinary citizen of the land of pure who simply believes in keeping his eyes and ears open and as tired and averse to all the gimmickry and everyday drama staged on the political stage by the buffoons, we hold in high esteem and reverence and shamelessly call our leaders. Neither do I believe in generalizations or stereotyping (or atleast I suppose so) nor drawing corresponding inference from an action just for the simple reason that it is associated with a particular source.

Yes. If I have some regard for the man, that is for his well rounded leadership skills. For he is the only skipper who led us to the victory stands during the ‘92 cricket world cup. I believe, that is extraordinary as no one else could accomplish the feat in 36 years of world cup history for Pakistan, even with much more talented super stars and players in the respective teams. A glance upon the history of the game reveals that despite various controversies, Imran Khan is easily one of the most successful captains, the cricket of Pakistan has known. Those who think I am digressing, I am actually not, as various leadership theories emphasize that it is the personality and personal attributes that formulate the central core of leadership skills or abilities. So whether you are leading a political party, a nation or a cricket team, it has more to do with your core personality, vision and motivational charisma than prowess and acumen.

In addition to that, Imran Khan has shown much more consistency in his political career than any other so called political leader, I have known lately. He is one person who has contributed directly to health and education main stream by establishing mega projects such as Shaukat Khanam Cancer Hospital and Namal University for the common man.

When it comes to drone attacks, I’ll rather base my case on facts, figures and reason than on rhetoric. The emphasis shall be upon the basic human rights’ violation as opposed to any political argument. As the various authentic sources reveal and the buzz is in the air, some 1184 innocent citizens have been butchered by drone attacks just in 2010. Wikipedia quotes the number of the slaughtered since 2004 anywhere between 1439 and 2290 including significant number of women and children, even infants. Brookings Institution suggests that Drone strikes may kill 10 or so civilians for every militant killed. Whereas, according to Pakistani sources, against the strike on every single terrorist or extremist, 50 innocent lives are acclaimed. How shameless can it really get when we dismiss it with such a God forsakenly brazen expression as ‘collateral damage’!? Are we living in stone age? We are talking of human blood and gore for God sake!

Where are all those so called champions of human rights who keep on jumping like clowns on every drop of the pin? Why are they deaf and blind to all that unjust bloodshed? It is disgusting even to watch some of the self proclaimed human rights’ workers to ridicule Imran for the simple reason that they cannot get over his right wing political leaning. At least he has the guts to stand for a just cause and humanity that I see as more than a mere lame attempt at gaining some political mileage.

Not that the butchering of innocent population like herds of sheep and goats can be justified in any way, when it comes to effectiveness of the drone attacks, how far have they been able to weed out extremism? How many scalps of proclaimed offenders or terrorists have we claimed and how many terrorist attacks or suicidal strikes have we been able to suppress so far in 7 years? What good has it contributed to restoration of regional peace?

It is not about Imran Khan or his politics but it is about standing up for a just cause and lives of innocent Pakistanis. Forget national sovereignty, forget foreign intervention, forget that nefarious and bogus war against terror_ how bizarre and ironic it really seems asking for the right of basic existence and putting forth a demand as innocent as sparing of those precious human lives and letting them live in peace in that rush of madness, supremacy and brutality!?. Really wonder if we are living in 21st century or are we transported back in history to the age of darkness and times of Genghis Khan?

In this golden era of modern civilization, a tower of human scalps is growing and well on the making for the world to witness! 

Sources :- 

http://www.presstv.ir/usdetail/174477.html 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drone_attacks_in_Pakistan

 

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From the pen ( oops keypad ) of a young doc. Being reproduced originally

As the young doctors’ strike in Punjab continues in its second month, the longest ever in memory and the first one in history (as per credible sources) to shut down the emergencies completely, putting the death toll up as 10 documented cases till the last update and with thousands of patients denied access not only to the emergency, but also outdoor services and indoor services including diagnostic procedures and operations.
Doctors have been labeled as being insensitive and without a conscience. Of being a silent spectator to the agony of thousands of patients while keeping their mercenary interests at heart. This is how the picture would look from outside.
While the closure of emergencies is debatable and not personally endorsed, like many other things in our society at present that we are witness to in recent times, this also has a two-dimensional view, like two sides of a coin. To anyone cognizant of the problems plaguing our health sector, would know that this was a volcano waiting to erupt. This is the manifestation of the deprivation and anger experienced by the healers of a nation that have been denied their access to a decent living despite being the cream of the nation in terms of academics and toiling for long hours with no respite. Being overworked and underpaid is a combination that does not bear well with graduates who have invested a considerable amount of labour and their family’s money to earn this degree. Parents who send their children to medical schools thinking they will get a payback on their investment as soon as their child earns the coveted title of a ‘doctor’. In face of rising competition on both public and private fronts, their dream is hardly, if ever realized.
The ultimate culprit is of course our infrastructure which has a meager health budget and in that the key deliverers of healthcare are given very low priority. So much so that they have to work unpaid, sometimes for years. The ultimate aim of every doctor aspiring to be wealthy is practicing in private, but that includes years of rigorous training before they are able to qualify. This and the absence of job security with the Government reluctant to fill permanent posts compounds the problem. This has led to a massive brain drain of doctors choosing instead to serve in more lucrative posts in the West and Middle East. So have been things for a while.
What is different this time is that with a free media and democracy, our nation is much more vocal and unafraid to voice their demands. And the winds of change have swept the health sector too. These young practitioners are much more daring and outgoing than their predecessors in raising their voices to the injustices committed to their community. They know their worth, though the Government has been slow in realizing it and they have successfully demonstrated it. These are not the doctors of yore who were content with what little was being thrown their way and ultimately seeking their livelihood abroad as consultant posts even after post graduation are few and far between. They on a large scale represent the Pakistan of today, the youth who want their right and they want it NOW. They are not scared of the repercussions primarily because they have nothing to lose.
If successful, their case would be cited as an example where a deprived lot fighting for their due recognition has brought the system down to its knees.

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Amidst all that drama, popping eyes, gaping mouths and boggling minds, the double murder convict American national and alleged CIA contractor Raymond Davis has been neatly whisked away from the scene triggering another controversy.

The abrupt unexpected development in addition to several other lasting effects has thankfully given plenty of fodder and fuel to the rattled talk show hosts and (yellow) journalists to set the whole world ablaze. Likes of Hamid Mir and Ansar Abbass, who I’d stop short of labeling leaning right wingers, but chronic pessimists and master propaganda campaigners can safely sensationalize, scream and whine going on and on for another couple of weeks over the issue.

Coming back to the core discussion, at the risk of being termed out of my mind, I’d venture to opine differently as opposed to popular point of view. While there are multiple dimensions attached to the controversy, for one, I see the conclusion salvaging some of our national pride rather than compromising the national honour or dignity. What makes me utter that so bluntly is the fact that despite all the pressure the government and judiciary were subjected to, we have been able to conduct and conclude a judicial trial. Although, the way events progressed they ultimately lead to the most logical and apparent climax and drop scene. US government resorting to its immense bargaining power and unfair disposition was able to recover its national as was being predominantly perceived from the very onset _ yet again bringing home the paradoxical fact that how sacred American blood is as opposed to the cheap Pakistani fluid that is spilled in gallons when our citizens are butchered and massacred like herds of nameless sheep and goat at the shameless excuse and pretext of ‘terror strikes’ and drone attacks. But then who are we to complain or crib when the ultimate champions of human rights justify all the brutality and slaughter in most convincing and categorical oratory?

Looking from the non political and personal perspective, as far as my limited knowledge goes, a murder can be settled against the blood money in the light of Islamic laws. But does that hold under the peculiar circumstances when the young widow had committed suicide against the killing of her husband in sheer protest and disappointment? And, though indirectly related, but how do we account for the innocent killing of the motor bike rider who was crushed by an unknown vehicle allegedly coming to the aid and rescue of Raymond Davis? At the same time the suspicious facts that have unfolded and marred the controversy and the deal cannot be dismissed lightly.

While it is hard to digest the irony when those who are protesting against an outcome achieved by resorting to Shariah laws happen to be the biggest advocates of Islamic laws and their enforcement, what is ironic is that how long the courts will take to mete out justice against a murderer who while vowing to protect the life and property of the governor, killed him in broad daylight in the presence of dozens of eyewitnesses?

Any thoughts?

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